Pattern detection and language errors

One thing I’ve been thinking about as T learns new words is how our brains are wired to detect patterns and how useful that is for learning language.

Human brains are AMAZING at detecting patterns – and, thinking about and watching T learn new words, it’s so clear to me how important pattern detection is. For example, T has primarily learned the word “horse” (he doesn’t say it yet, but will make a clip-clopping noise when he sees one in a book) by looking at pictures of horses in books and playing with a toy horse that we have at home. But, all of these horses are different – some are realistic photos, some are cartoonish and colored unrealistic colors, some are more realistic cartoon drawings, etc. So, T has learned to generalize across all these different instances of horses to learn some pattern like “a horse is an object with four legs, a longish neck, and a mane, and it makes a clip-clopping noise.” Thinking about this is kind of amazing to me!

But, sometimes it’s possible to learn a pattern incorrectly – for example, by learning a pattern that is a bit too broad. An example of this might be if T had learned the pattern “a horse is an object with 4 legs and is sometimes brown” – this pattern might lead him to identify a picture of a cow as a horse (which sometimes happens with one particular cow in a book that we have :)).

T frequently makes pattern errors that both amuse and interest me. One of the more humorous ones involves his identification of pictures of my father (T’s grandfather, whom we call “thatha” – “grandfather” in Tamil). My father wears transition-lenses glasses (so they frequently look like sunglasses, even inside). T recently saw a picture of Ray Charles and insistently pointed at the photo yelling “Thatha! Thatha!” I guess T’s “pattern” for his grandfather is an older man who wears sunglasses!

One of the things about T’s errors that interests me is which words he tends to make more “errors” with. I think that he tends to “correctly” use nouns much more than non-nouns, and thinking about this in terms of pattern detection, I think this makes sense. I think that the “pattern” for most nouns is generally easier to deduce than for non-nouns. For example, “ball” is a fairly concrete clear concept, compared to, for example, “up” and “down.” “Up” and “down” are used in so many different contexts – lifting T up and down, picking something up off the floor, going up and down steps, etc, whereas “ball” is basically a round toy (although T will sometimes call fruit like melons balls!).

And, I think that T tends to have more interesting interpretations (and by this, I mean broad!) for when words like “all done” and “bye bye” should be used. Perhaps this is because he’s still trying to learn the “pattern” for these words!

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